Pitch Wars Mentor Book Spotlight and Giveaway with Molly Lee!
Aug22

Pitch Wars Mentor Book Spotlight and Giveaway with Molly Lee!

Molly Lee Website | Twitter | Facebook | Instagram Molly Lee is an author, editor, and mentor best known from Pitch Wars, a program that connects promising writers to established authors in the community. She writes NA contemporary and YA urban fantasy with strong heroines who are unafraid to challenge their male counterparts, yet still vulnerable enough to have love sneak up on them. Throw in high-octane action or any kind of supernatural element and she’ll be hooked. A military spouse with two children and one stubborn english bulldog, Molly enjoys watching storms from the back porch of her Midwest home and digging for treasures at local antique shops.   Edge of Chaos Amazon | Goodreads Blake Caster has been in an emotionally abusive relationship with Justin for so long, she can’t tell what is normal anymore, and so she clings to the one thing that is solidly hers—her passion for extreme weather. Three years into her Meteorology degree, Blake meets professional storm chaser, Dash Lexington, who is as gorgeous as he is daring. Instantly recognizing her passion and skills in analyzing weather data, he makes a spot for her on his tight-knit storm chasing team. Dash and Blake form a fast friendship and it forces her to realize just how toxic her relationship with Justin is. She can’t deny the lightning-worthy chemistry she has with Dash or how her heart stalls every time he gets too close to a tornado. With each chase and the cherished moments with Dash, Blake discovers her own self-worth and gains the strength to end things with Justin for good. But he won’t go easily. As Blake tries to sever ties with one man, she fears she’ll lose the other to his dangerous obsession—and she doesn’t know if she’ll be enough to save him from the impending storm that could end them all.   Excerpt from Edge of Chaos . . . The sky was light behind the dark-gray storm cloud, which made the green grass and red dirt below it seem more vibrant. Dash’s eyes fixated on the storm before us, their green shining with an intensity I now realized he only held when a storm was in sight. “It’s got potential,” he said with a wicked grin on his face. “Maybe you’ll see one touch down today, Blake.” I swallowed hard, both excited and scared of the prospect. “I wish it was more organized,” John said, letting his camera hang against his chest. “Me, too,” Dash said, pointing at the northeast portion of the wall cloud. “Look, there’s a little rotation.” I focused on where he pointed and saw the slightest bit of movement within the...

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The Art of Holding On and Letting Go by Kristin Bartley Lentz . . . Guest Post and Book Release!
Aug22

The Art of Holding On and Letting Go by Kristin Bartley Lentz . . . Guest Post and Book Release!

Kristin Bartley Lenz Website  |  Twitter Kristin Bartley Lenz is a writer and social worker from metro-Detroit who fell in love with the mountains when she moved to Georgia and California. Now she’s back in Detroit where she plots wilderness escapes and manages the Michigan Chapter blog for the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators (SCBWI). The Art of Holding On and Letting Go is her first novel.   From Kristin . . . When I titled my YA novel, The Art of Holding On and Letting Go, I had no idea it would also become the perfect metaphor for my journey to publication. “It takes ten years to get published.” I don’t remember the speaker who said this at my first SCBWI-MI conference in 2003, but I heard those words repeatedly over the years at other conferences, online forums, and networking groups. Ten years sounded daunting, but it was also a relief. I could focus on improving my craft without the pressure of publishing right away. And of course it couldn’t really take ten years, could it? Fast forward five years. I had a middle grade novel that was way too autobiographical – I knew it was my practice book and needed to be shelved. But I also had two completed YA novels. An agent loved the second one and offered representation. Yes! I was ahead of the curve! She submitted The Art of Holding On and Letting Go to editors during the recession of 2007-2008. That’s when I learned that many of the first novels signed by agents don’t sell. That it’s often your second, third, or even your sixth novel that finally sells. I resumed my focus on craft and revised my other YA novel, but TAOHOALG continued to tug at me. I completely rewrote it after working with Carolyn Coman at the Highlights Foundation Whole Novel Workshop. My agent didn’t want to resubmit it. And she still didn’t like my other novel. That’s when I learned that agent relationships don’t always last, that sometimes you have to make a change to find the best fit. The Art of Holding On and Letting Go won first place or finaled in nearly every contest I entered. Other agents showed immediate interest, but ran away when they learned it had been previously subbed. Editors gave me drastically conflicting revision suggestions. I set the manuscript aside. A new agent offered representation based on my other novel. It didn’t sell. I wrote another novel. It didn’t sell. I focused on my social work career, I hosted two foreign exchange students, I volunteered for the PTA – basically anything I...

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