VLOG: How To Revise Without Going Crazy
Jul06

VLOG: How To Revise Without Going Crazy

Big revisions can often equal BIG stress. And when you have to make the kind of changes that feel like you’re writing an entirely different book, you may feel like you’re about to crack. With Pitch Wars coming up, it’s important to mentally prepare for the revision of your life! Here are a couple of tips to help you get in the right mindset so you can be your most productive revising self...

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Get to know the Pitch Wars Mentors Mini Interviews . . . No. 16 Young Adult
Jul06

Get to know the Pitch Wars Mentors Mini Interviews . . . No. 16 Young Adult

From June 27th through July 18th, we’ll be posting mini-interviews with most of the Pitch Wars mentors so you can get to know them. Many of the mentors also hang out on twitter. Follow the links to their Twitter accounts and say hello. They’ll be on the #PitchWars hashtag tweeting advice and answering questions. We will also host live chats from July 19th through August 2nd, and the Pitch Wars submission window will open on August 3rd! We asked our mentors to answer these three questions … What are you looking for in a submission and what would you forgive as far as issues in the sample pages? In other words, what do you feel is an easy fix and what would be a pass for you? What is your editing style and do you have a game plan to tackle edits with your mentee in the two months given for the contest? And lastly, what is your all-time favorite book and how did it inspire your writing? And here are their answers … Kristin Wright Twitter  |  Website Kristin is a native Detroiter, but she lives in verrrrrrry rural Central Virginia now: over a mile of gravel road from any pavement anywhere. She has a husband, two boys, two dogs, and some indifferent cows. Favorite things: Hamilton, all things U.K., anything you can find in a museum, Cheezits, coffee, and her beloved writing group. She writes contemporary YA and women’s fiction, and is represnted by the delightful Sarah E. Younger of the Nancy Yost Literary Agency. ONE: The first answer to that is that it’s subjective. I want to be captured by a story and intrigued by a character. Last year I saw some beautifully written material I didn’t choose, so know that subjectivity is a thing out of the gate. You can fix some grammatical errors, but too many show me you haven’t studied your craft. Most common, and fixable, is having too much backstory at the start or starting in the wrong place. TWO: Yes, my usual plan is to read the entire manuscript, usually before selection announcements are made, and write an edit letter with the big picture things: are you starting in the right place, which characters are underdeveloped, does the end satisfy, is the pacing a problem in the middle, etc. Then I send it back as soon as possible after the announcement so you have as much time as possible to fix it. The hope is that there’ll be time for me to do a second (or even third) read for line-edit/sentence level stuff before the contest. This worked well last year, and is...

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Get to know the Pitch Wars Mentors Mini Interviews . . . No. 15 Young Adult
Jul06

Get to know the Pitch Wars Mentors Mini Interviews . . . No. 15 Young Adult

From June 27th through July 18th, we’ll be posting mini-interviews with most of the Pitch Wars mentors so you can get to know them. Many of the mentors also hang out on twitter. Follow the links to their Twitter accounts and say hello. They’ll be on the #PitchWars hashtag tweeting advice and answering questions. We will also host live chats from July 19th through August 2nd, and the Pitch Wars submission window will open on August 3rd! We asked our mentors to answer these three questions … 1. What are you looking for in a submission and what would you forgive as far as issues in the sample pages? In other words, what do you feel is an easy fix and what would be a pass for you? 2. What is your editing style and do you have a game plan to tackle edits with your mentee in the two months given for the contest? 3. And lastly, what is your all-time favorite book and how did it inspire your writing? And here are their answers …   Kelly Hopkins Twitter |  Website Kelly has a Bachelor’s degree (Magna Cum Laude) in English/Secondary Education from Marywood University and a Master’s of Education degree in School Library and Information Technologies from Mansfield University of Pennsylvania. She’s a Creative Writing teacher and school librarian. She has lectured at Keystone College on Celtic Mythology and will be presenting a workshop on Perfecting Query Letters and Pitches at their Gathering Conference in July 2016. Kelly lives in NE Pennsylvania with her husband, two children, and three rescue horses. Her fiction is represented by Sue Miller at Donaghy Literary Group. ONE: I am looking for a hook that catches my attention right from the beginning. As a creative writing teacher, I hope to see a ms that is free of passive voice and has characters that I want to travel 200+ pages with. I have to care about your characters wants, needs, and desires from page one. If you are a master of visual storytelling, send me your ms! A pass would be significant grammatical errors and opening pages that take too long to develop. Know your genre–YA is all about the pacing! Get into the story early, and make sure you know what that inciting incident is. Thread all the exposition in later. TWO: I provide line edits in Word with embedded comments and suggestions. Sometimes, I will rewrite full paragraphs as examples. It is my hope that the mentee can take direction in the first few chapters and carry it forward through the ms each week as we cut the task up into manageable...

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