Get to know the Pitch Wars Mentors Mini Interviews . . . No. 8 Young Adult/New Adult
Jun30

Get to know the Pitch Wars Mentors Mini Interviews . . . No. 8 Young Adult/New Adult

From June 27th through July 18th, we’ll be posting mini-interviews with most of the Pitch Wars mentors so you can get to know them. Many of the mentors also hang out on twitter. Follow the links to their Twitter accounts and say hello. They’ll be on the #PitchWars hashtag tweeting advice and answering questions. We will also host live chats from July 19th through August 2nd, and the Pitch Wars submission window will open on August 3rd! We asked our mentors to answer these three questions … 1. What are you looking for in a submission and what would you forgive as far as issues in the sample pages? In other words, what do you feel is an easy fix and what would be a pass for you? 2. What is your editing style and do you have a game plan to tackle edits with your mentee in the two months given for the contest? 3. And lastly, what is your all-time favorite book and how did it inspire your writing? And here are their answers … Charlie Holmberg Twitter  |  Website Born in Salt Lake City, Charlie N. Holmberg was raised a Trekkie alongside three sisters who also have boy names. She graduated from BYU, plays the ukulele, owns too many pairs of glasses, and hopes to one day own a dog. ONE:  I’m looking for originality, both in the premise and with the main character. I’m not interested in the trope of a girl-gone-warrior or a snarky voice. Easy fixes are small to medium consistency errors, plot holes, or character motivations. Automatic passes are large problems in those areas, cliche ideas, and grammar/syntax that will take far too long to get into shape. TWO:  Different edits require different game plans, so I don’t have one ready before reading the submissions. I put the most emphasis on developmental edits, because if plot/character/setting don’t work, the story will not work. A misspelled word here or there or an awkward sentence now and then will not make an editor or agent pass on a good book. Story comes first. THREE:  This is an impossible question! I don’t know about all-time favorite, but the book that may have effected my writing the most is Howl’s Moving Castle by Dianna Wynne Jones. I love the sense of whimsy to it and have tried to incorporate that whimsy into many of my own stories. (#2 would be the Mistborn trilogy by Brandon Sanderson, which has seriously shaped how I do magic systems.) Diana Gallagher Twitter  |  Website Though Diana Gallagher be but little, she is fierce. She’s also a gymnastics coach and judge,...

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Get to know the Pitch Wars Mentors Mini Interviews . . . No. 7 Adult/New Adult
Jun30

Get to know the Pitch Wars Mentors Mini Interviews . . . No. 7 Adult/New Adult

From June 27th through July 18th, we’ll be posting mini-interviews with most of the Pitch Wars mentors so you can get to know them. Many of the mentors also hang out on twitter. Follow the links to their Twitter accounts and say hello. They’ll be on the #PitchWars hashtag tweeting advice and answering questions. We will also host live chats from July 19th through August 2nd, and the Pitch Wars submission window will open on August 3rd! We asked our mentors to answer these three questions … 1. What are you looking for in a submission and what would you forgive as far as issues in the sample pages? In other words, what do you feel is an easy fix and what would be a pass for you? 2. What is your editing style and do you have a game plan to tackle edits with your mentee in the two months given for the contest? 3. And lastly, what is your all-time favorite book and how did it inspire your writing? And here are their answers …   Layla Reyne Twitter  |  Website Romantic Suspense and Contemporary Romance Author. Reluctant Attorney. Displaced Tar Heel. Foodie and Fangirl. Lover of books, TV, food, wine, whiskey, designer shoes, smushed-face dogs, and a hodgepodge of sports teams. 2016 RWA® Golden Heart® Finalist. Rep’d by Laura Bradford of the Bradford Literary Agency. ONE: I want to see a good, clean entry that has a distinctive voice and hooks me from page one. We can work on pacing, plot, fleshing out characters, and minor copy edit fixes. But if there are basic craft issues, such as head hopping and shifting tenses, or if there’s not a happy ending, it’s a pass for me. TWO: I’ll read the full and provide a manuscript assessment, focusing primarily on big picture developmental items (plot, pacing, characters, setting, etc.). We’ll chat and formulate a realistic game plan for making revisions. Once I get the revised manuscript back, I’ll give it another read, let my mentee know if anything else, big-picture-wise, is still amiss. When the story is in good shape, I’ll copy edit the first three chapters and maybe more (time depending). THREE: To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf. I loved the lyrical, moody prose of it and the coastal setting, which shows up a lot in my stories. I also wanted more at the end, so for a school writing project, I drafted an epilogue. Thus began my dive into fanfiction and from there original fiction.   Michelle Hazen Twitter  |  Website Michelle is a nomadic wildlife biologist who was forced to get a set of solar panels and a smartphone...

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