Get to know the Pitch Wars Mentors Mini Interviews . . . No. 2 Adult
Jun27

Get to know the Pitch Wars Mentors Mini Interviews . . . No. 2 Adult

From June 27th through July 18th, we’ll be posting mini-interviews with most of the Pitch Wars mentors so you can get to know them. Many of the mentors also hang out on twitter. Follow the links to their Twitter accounts and say hello. They’ll be on the #PitchWars hashtag tweeting advice and answering questions. We will also host live chats from July 19th through August 2nd, and the Pitch Wars submission window will open on August 3rd! We asked our mentors to answer these three questions … 1. What are you looking for in a submission and what would you forgive as far as issues in the sample pages? In other words, what do you feel is an easy fix and what would be a pass for you? 2. What is your editing style and do you have a game plan to tackle edits with your mentee in the two months given for the contest? 3. And lastly, what is your all-time favorite book and how did it inspire your writing? And here are their answers …   Jennie Nash Twitter  |  Website  |  Author Accelerator Jennie Nash is the author of four novels, three memoirs, and a guide to help writers get over the worst moments in the writing life. Five of her seven books were published by Big 5 publishers and she self published two. Jennie runs a private book-coaching business for writers of memoir, non-fiction, and fiction. Her clients have won national indie publishing awards, landed top New York agents, and had books published by Scribner, Simon & Schuster, and Ten Speed, among others. She has been an instructor at the UCLA Extension Writing Program for ten years and is the founder and chief creative officer of Author Accelerator, a book coaching program for dedicated writers. She is represented by Faye Bender of The Book Group. Recent client memoir successes include The Accidental Truth by Lauri Taylor and For the Love of Money by Sam Polk. ONE: I am open to almost any topic and almost any structure (a straight narrative; a collection of connected pieces; a story that includes how-to or self-help elements), but I am looking for a memoir that is generous of heart and universal in scope — something that can help me better understand myself and the world. It must have a structure and a point. Just because something happened — even something dramatic — is not enough to get me to care. If you have written your memoir simply to make sense of your own life and with no thought as to who might read it, or what they might get out...

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Get to know the Pitch Wars Mentors Mini Interviews . . . No. 1 Adult
Jun27

Get to know the Pitch Wars Mentors Mini Interviews . . . No. 1 Adult

From June 27th through July 18th, we’ll be posting mini-interviews with most of the Pitch Wars mentors so you can get to know them. Many of the mentors also hang out on twitter. Follow the links to their Twitter accounts and say hello. They’ll be on the #PitchWars hashtag tweeting advice and answering questions. We will also host live chats from July 19th through August 2nd, and the Pitch Wars submission window will open on August 3rd! We asked our mentors to answer these three questions … 1. What are you looking for in a submission and what would you forgive as far as issues in the sample pages? In other words, what do you feel is an easy fix and what would be a pass for you? 2. What is your editing style and do you have a game plan to tackle edits with your mentee in the two months given for the contest? 3. And lastly, what is your all-time favorite book and how did it inspire your writing? And here are their answers … Carrie Callaghan Twitter  |  Website Carrie Callaghan’s short fiction has appeared in Silk Road, The MacGuffin, Floodwall, and elsewhere. She is a senior editor with the Washington Independent Review of Books, and is represented by Shannon Hassan of MarsalLyon. ONE: I’m looking for smart, confident writing that has a story to tell. Honestly, subjectivity will play a major role — is this a story I’d want to read? And, like all of us, my tastes are very idiosyncratic. More specifically, if I can tell the writer understands how a sentence works and flows, then I’ll much more easily pardon structural flaws (like starting the story in the wrong place, or slowing the reader down with unnecessary narration and backstory). Sample pages that are choppy or shallow, with passive voice and weak verbs, will waddle their way right to the “no thanks” pile. TWO: Is it August yet? I can’t wait to dive into someone’s beautiful story and make it even better. I’m an editor with the Washington Independent Review of Books, and I adore the thrill of polishing promising writing until it sparkles. For PitchWars, I plan to throw as much as I can at my mentee immediately, but prioritizing the structural issues. Is the story starting in the right place? Do we have enough scenes that maintain tension? Does the protagonist earn the ending? I have to confess, I’m also prepping a recommended (required?) reading list. I’ll probably put that up on my blog as fair warning … THREE: Don’t make me answer this! (*Brenda, very politely, threatens to pull the...

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Ask the Pitch Wars Mentees! – by Rebecca McLaughlin
Jun27

Ask the Pitch Wars Mentees! – by Rebecca McLaughlin

Pitch Wars: Got Questions? Hey there! Have questions about Pitch Wars? Want to know what it was like and how successful it was? Want to ask the participants from last year? Guess what—you totally can! If you’re curious about Pitch Wars, or not sure you want to enter, or maybe you totally for-reals do want to enter, but you’re not sure what the process really looks like? Don’t fret! We can help! Community is Key We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again: The best part about Pitch Wars and Pitch parties is the writing community it fosters. Community is key. Writers struggle through doubt (not to mention the query trenches), and we struggle with patience and inspiration. But what keeps us going—aside from coffee—is our support for one another. The Pitch Wars 2015 Crew has stayed involved and active in the last year that we’ve known each other, and we want to pay it forward. We want to help other writers in any way we can! So we’re providing resources and advice for Pitch Wars Generation 2016! Prove it! OK! Take a look at what the mentees from Pitch Wars 2015 have done together as a community. Since our magical adventure together, we’ve put together TWO blogs! Ask Authors Tumblr To The Shelves blog Our Ask Authors Tumblr focuses on answering questions from visitors (like you, nudge-nudge!) Check it out! Ask Authors Tumblr! Access the experience, wisdom, and silliness of over 100 writers! Among us, we have over 50 agented authors, and at least 5 book deals! We ask and answer a big question each week, and we’ll answer questions from visitors all the time. Ask us anything! We’re accepting any questions you may have about Pitch Wars! Anything you want to know about our experiences, we’re happy to talk about! What was Pitch Wars really like? How did we feel when we saw our names on the Mentee list? What did our revisions look like? Do we still talk to our mentor(s)? Do we have any regrets? What percentage of us got agent deals or book deals in the year since the contest? How did we pick what mentor to apply to? Ask us anything! We’ll do our best to give a wide variety of answers from our merry crew of writers. We won’t shy away from difficult questions. If you’re nervous, don’t worry! You can ask questions anonymously (you don’t even need a Tumblr account). If your question sparks a longer post, or if one of the crew wants to answer your question more in-depth, we’ll send you on over to the To The Shelves...

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