VLOG: 10 Ways to Prep for Pitch Wars in Under 5 Minutes

Pitch Wars is just around the corner. Here are a few ways you can start prepping now! How else do you like to prep for Pitch Wars? Leave your suggestion in the comments below!

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Day 6 (Part 2) of June Setting Workshop with Pitch Wars Mentor Susan Bishop Crispell
Jun08

Day 6 (Part 2) of June Setting Workshop with Pitch Wars Mentor Susan Bishop Crispell

Welcome to June’s Setting Workshop! From a Rafflecopter lottery drawing, we selected over thirty writers to participate. Each mentor has graciously critiqued a 500 word sample chosen by the writers from a place he or she felt needed help with setting. We hope that not only you’ll learn a little bit about setting that you can apply to your own writing, but that you’ll also be able to get to know some of our wonderful Pitch Wars mentors and their editing styles. We appreciate our mentors for giving up their time to do the critiques. If you have something encouraging to add, feel free to comment below. Please keep all comments tasteful. We will delete any inappropriate or hurtful ones. And now we have … Pitch Wars Mentor Susan Bishop Crispell  Twitter | Website I am the author of the forthcoming women’s fiction novels THE SECRET INGREDIENT OF WISHES (Thomas Dunne/St. Martin’s Press, 2016), and THE PROBABILITY OF FATE (Thomas Dunne/St. Martin’s Press, 2017). I have a B.F.A. in creative writing from The University of North Carolina – Wilmington. I live and write near Wilmington, NC with my husband, Mark, and our two literary-named cats. Aside from writing, I obsess over swoony fictional boys and baked goods and watch quirky TV shows, most of which canceled way before their time (and I have a wax lion to prove it!).   The 500 Word Critique . . . Adult Historical Fiction Leslie Martin   The town of Welch, West Virginia was not large by any stretch of the imagination. [Instead of telling us the town is small, describe it in a way that shows some of William’s personality (e.g., The town of Welch, West Virginia could have fit in William’s Army-issued rucksack with room to spare.).] William knew that before he went off to war, but while he was in Europe it must have shrunk. [Nice.] Of all of those blocks he had walked in Paris, just the path from the hospital to his favorite park bench [I like this idea, but it needs more context to help the reader see it. How far is the park? Across the street from the hospital or two corners over?] would have taken him from one side of his hometown to the other. When he stepped off the train onto the platform he could see the northern and southern edges of town [What marks the edges of town? Do the buildings stop and trees or flat road take over? Is there a landmark that signals the beginning of the town (water tower, flag pole, etc?)] from where he stood just by turning his head. Above the roof of the train station,...

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Day 6 of June Setting Workshop with Pitch Wars Mentor Pintip Dunn
Jun08

Day 6 of June Setting Workshop with Pitch Wars Mentor Pintip Dunn

Welcome to June’s Setting Workshop! From a Rafflecopter lottery drawing, we selected over thirty writers to participate. Each mentor has graciously critiqued a 500 word sample chosen by the writers from a place he or she felt needed help with setting. We hope that not only you’ll learn a little bit about setting that you can apply to your own writing, but that you’ll also be able to get to know some of our wonderful Pitch Wars mentors and their editing styles. We appreciate our mentors for giving up their time to do the critiques. If you have something encouraging to add, feel free to comment below. Please keep all comments tasteful. We will delete any inappropriate or hurtful ones. And now we have … Pitch Wars Mentor Pintip Dunn   Website  |  Twitter When my first-grade teacher asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up, I replied, “An author.” Although I have pursued other interests over the years, this dream has never wavered. I graduated from Harvard University, magna cum laude, with an A.B. in English Literature and Language. I received my J.D. at Yale Law School, where I was an editor of the YALE LAW JOURNAL. I published an article in the YALE LAW JOURNAL, entitled, “How Judges Overrule: Speech Act Theory and the Doctrine of Stare Decisis,” and received the Barry S. Kaplan Prize for best paper in Law and Literature. I am represented by literary agent Beth Miller of Writers House. I’m a 2012 Golden Heart® finalist and a 2014 double-finalist. I’m a member of Romance Writers of America, Washington Romance Writers, YARWA, and The Golden Network. I live with my husband and children in Maryland. The 500 Word Critique . . . YA Sci Fi   Mars Year 103, Month 7, Sols 414 (Universal Solar Time) Earth Year 2148, April 15th   I slanted a glance [you could just say “glanced” here. It’s cleaner.] out the window. Every time, I expected to catch a glimpse of the Old Planet. But all I saw was black, vast empty space. [I think you could add some detail in one or other of the previous two sentences. If the space really was black emptiness, perhaps you can say what she expected to see of the old planet — greens, blues? what does a planet look like from space?] The Epoch1955 had been my home for the last twelve universal weeks. And though I knew it’d be years before I could download, [this verb threw me off; I don’t know exactly what you mean, and it is better to be more clear at the beginning so that the reader can ease into the world] I’d hoped to see Earth from a distance. No such luck. I glared at my wristband for what had...

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