DOWN WITH THE SHINE, Safe Wishing PSA & Giveaway!
Apr25

DOWN WITH THE SHINE, Safe Wishing PSA & Giveaway!

  Tomorrow is the release of my third book with HarperTeen, DOWN WITH THE SHINE.   About the book . . . There’s a reason they say “be careful what you wish for.” Just ask the girl who wished to be thinner and ended up smaller than Thumbelina, or the boy who asked for “balls of steel” and got them-literally. And never wish for your party to go on forever. Not unless you want your guests to be struck down by debilitating pain if they try to leave. These are things Lennie only learns when it’s too late-after she brings some of her uncles’ moonshine to a party and toasts to dozens of wishes, including a big wish of her own: to bring back her best friend, Dylan, who was abducted and murdered six months ago. Lennie didn’t mean to cause so much chaos. She always thought her uncles’ moonshine toast was just a tradition. And when they talked about carrying on their “important family legacy,” she thought they meant good old-fashioned bootlegging. As it turns out, they meant granting wishes. And Lennie has just granted more in one night than her uncles would grant in a year. Now she has to find a way to undo the damage. But once granted, a wish can’t be unmade…   Public Service Announcement . . . Because this book is about wishes and the many many many ways in which they can go wrong, I wanted to put together some helpful public service announcements – or PSA’s – to help other people out there make sure they’re wishing safely. Today, I’m revealing all three of them. The first one is here on Brenda’s blog, the other two can be found on Mindy McGinnis and my own personal blog. With each reveal is a separate giveaway to go with each trailer where you can win books and fun swag. And so without further ado, here it is – PSA #2 And here is giveaway #2 to go with PSA #2. Don’t forget to visit both Mindy’s and my own blog to see the other PSA’s and enter the other giveaways! a Rafflecopter giveaway   Kate Karyus Quinn is an avid reader and menthol chapstick addict. She has lived in California and Tennessee, but recently made the move back to her hometown of Buffalo, New York, with her husband and two children in tow. She promised them wonderful people, amazing food, and weather that would… build character. She is the author of ANOTHER LITTLE PIECE and (DON’T YOU) FORGET ABOUT ME both from HarperTeen....

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Don’t Be a Bully (or Raise One) by Laura Heffernan
Apr25

Don’t Be a Bully (or Raise One) by Laura Heffernan

Don’t Be a Bully (or Raise One) by Laura Heffernan This month, some of the other mentors have shared their experience with bullying, how it changed them. I hope these posts have made some people think about this problem, in realizing that our actions really do impact those around us. But if that’s not enough to make people care, to stop bullying (or to encourage their kids to stop), I want to talk about something else: the fact that actions have consequences. Battery is defined as a harmful or offensive touching. What’s offensive is based on what would be offensive to a reasonable person. Anything that causes bruising or leaves a mark is probably harmful, but offensive can extend to things like spitting in someone’s face (who wouldn’t be offended by that?); brushing against someone “accidentally” and shoving them out of the way or brushing areas they don’t want touched; or “petting” someone’s hair when they don’t want you to. You might think that’s funny or harmless, but it’s actually a misdemeanor. You (or your child) could wind up with a criminal record. Threatening someone is also a crime in most states. Engaging in a course of conduct that serves no legitimate purpose and is done solely to annoy, harass, or terrorize someone is ALSO criminal – and in many states, it falls within the definition of stalking. Do you really want your twelve-year-old to have a stalking conviction on his record? Maybe you’re reading this thinking, “Whatever. No one’s going to report me/my kid.” I can’t really speak to that, because my crystal balls in the shop. Or maybe you don’t care if you/your kid has a criminal record. But how would you feel about getting hit in the wallet? Ah, suddenly, that shove against the wall is less funny if it cost you $2,000 – or more. One Chicago family was sued for $50,000 for their child’s bullying. Sure, that’s just Chicago – but most states have laws that hold parents liable for intentional, wrongful acts such as assault, battery, property damage, and intentional infliction of emotional distress. On top of that, your child can always be sued. A judgment is good for usually 5-10 years, depending on the state, but can be renewed. In some states, it can be renewed forever. A judgment can be a black mark on your child’s credit before they’re even old enough to know what credit is. Entire job markets (like finance) could be unavailable to your child as a result of a civil judgment before they even finish high school. And as a practical matter, a lot of parents wind...

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