Get to know the Pitch Wars Mentors … mini interviews with MG & YA mentors
Aug12

Get to know the Pitch Wars Mentors … mini interviews with MG & YA mentors

For the past couple weeks we’ve been getting to know mentors on live chats on the Whiskey, Wine, & Writing site and by hopping to our mentors’ blogs to read their bios and wish lists. Today we have some mini-interviews with the mentors who couldn’t make the live chats. At the bottom of this post you’ll find YouTube links to some of the live chats. There are three more live chats happening this week. The first is tonight, next one is on Thursday, and the last is on Friday. Check out the Whiskey, Wine, & Writing site for the schedule and list of mentors joining the chats and watch them live. And there just might be a surprise happening on one of the upcoming chats. But for now, here are the mini-interviews … We asked our mentors to answer these three questions: 1. What are you looking for in a submission and what would you forgive as far as issues in the sample pages? In other words, what do you feel is an easy fix and what would be a pass for you? 2. What is your editing style and do you have a game plan to tackle edits with your mentee in the two months given for the contest? 3. And lastly, what is your all time favorite book and how did it inspire your writing? And here’s their answers …   Joy McCullough-Carranza Twitter 1. I’m looking for a submission that feels fresh, with a main character I haven’t seen a million times before, and clear and urgent stakes (internal and external). These don’t have to be end-of-the-world stakes; I’m a big fan of quiet. But they need to be clear and urgent to the character. What will happen if your character doesn’t achieve their goal? If the answer is their life will pretty much go on as usual, you have work to do. Raise—or clarify—the stakes is one of the most common bits of feedback I give in my freelance editing. Major story revisions are certainly not easy, but I’m excited to jump into those with a willing writer. I’m not interested in working with a stale premise. And I’ll pass if you don’t use an Oxford comma. (Kidding. Sort of. But you can expect a strongly worded lecture on the topic.) 2. In past Pitchwars, I have given my mentees thorough edit letters within about a week of choosing them. This letter will focus on broad story issues – plot holes, stakes, character development, etc. As the mentee works on their revisions, I’ll check in from time to time and they are welcome to contact...

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