THE COINCIDENCE OF COCONUT CAKE release day … Why Coconut Cake? by Amy Reichert
Jul21

THE COINCIDENCE OF COCONUT CAKE release day … Why Coconut Cake? by Amy Reichert

Amy Reichert Why Coconut Cake? Writers make a lot of decisions when creating their worlds. Where to set the story, when to set the story, eye color, hair color, car color. We invent facial tics and favorite curse words. We create elaborate back stories for secondary characters that may never make it into the book. Point is, it’s all there for a reason, even if it’s because the actor we based the character off of has a lopsided grin. So, dear reader, how did coconut cake make it into the book? Let’s look at my rambling thought process. I needed a reason for Lou to surprise her fiancé and catch him with another woman. Baking him a birthday cake and delivering it at an unexpected time helped set up that moment.Baking a cake is a systematic and precise process. Baking, in general, is more science than anything else, but because it’s food it sparks scent and taste memories—a perfect touchstone to Lou’s past. I could have chosen any kind of cake, but I love coconut. I love it the way some people love chocolate. As a child, I used to sneak bowls of shredded coconut into my closet and eat it. It would get dry and crunchy after a few days, but I ate it anyway (don’t judge me). This affinity came from my grandma who used to make a wonderful coconut cream pie. So when I needed to chose a cake, coconut seemed the right fit. I’m a nerd for alliteration. When we settled on The Coincidence of Coconut Cake for the title, I was down-right giddy because I could call it C3 (sometimes it’s the little things). One of my favorite techniques in books is when the author takes a common object and weaves it into the heart of the story, like Harry Potter’s scar or the green light in Gatsby. While I’m not delusional enough that my cake is as important or as meaningful as Harry’s scar, it does play an important role in bringing the story together. There you have it – a peek into my squirrely brain. Next time you’re reading, pay attention to all those details. They’re there for reason.   THE COINCIDENCE OF COCONUT CAKE released today! Here’s all the information about it … YOU’VE GOT MAIL meets HOW TO EAT A CUPCAKE in this delightful novel about a talented chef and the food critic who brings down her restaurant—whose chance meeting turns into a delectable romance of mistaken identities. In downtown Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Lou works tirelessly to build her beloved yet struggling French restaurant, Luella’s, into a success. She cheerfully balances...

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Day Fifteen of July’s First Page Workshop with Pitch Wars Mentors … Lori Goldstein & Traci Chee/Renee Ahdieh
Jul21

Day Fifteen of July’s First Page Workshop with Pitch Wars Mentors … Lori Goldstein & Traci Chee/Renee Ahdieh

Welcome to July’s First Page Workshop with some of our past and present PitchWars mentors. From a Rafflecopter lottery drawing, we selected many wonderful writers to participate in the workshop. Each mentor has graciously critiqued a first page for one lucky writer. The writers are anonymous. Follow along all month to view the first page critiques. We welcome comments and further suggestions, but please keep them kind and respectful. Here are the next two mentors and their critiques … Lori Goldstein Website | Twitter | Facebook | Goodreads | Instagram | Tumblr   Lori Goldstein, author of BECOMING JINN, was raised in a small town on the New Jersey shore and now makes her home outside of Boston. She has a BA in journalism and worked as a writer, editor, and graphic designer before becoming a full-time author. She currently lives and writes outside of Boston. Lori is the author of the young adult contemporary fantasy series Becoming Jinn (Feiwel and Friends/Macmillan, April 21, 2015, Spring 2016). You can visit her online at www.lorigoldsteinbooks.com. Buy Her Book: IndieBound Barnes and Noble Amazon     Lori’s first page critique … “It’s a lie Jackson, everything is a lie. Find the eyes Jackson…They watch us Jackson, the eyes are always watching….” [Hello! Thanks for being brave enough to submit your first page for critique! I’m a copyeditor by trade so I’m going to start off with some CE tips! You need to add commas before “Jackson.” Also, I think you should cut the ellipses. You are quoting what Gramps said and unless you are leaving bits out, you don’t need the ellipses. They are potentially distracting.] These were the last words that Gramps spoke, as his lips [,which had been?] dried by the winds of a thousand sand storms fell silent for the last time. [I’m confused by the “as” phrase. It took me a few tries to get it. Take a look at this and see how you can adjust it so it’s clear. You never want a reader to stumble on the first line. I added something to help, but it’s a voice that falls silent not lips…I wonder if you can start a bit stronger here.] I didn’t expect the words or the death, although the illness had been putrid inside of him for months. [Again, this is a bit awkward. I have to read these sentences more than once to see what you mean. That’s never a great thing and especially on page one. Clarity goes a long way. Be careful with your prose and make sure every word and sentence is as clear as you can make it.] A sickening smell of sourness...

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