July Workshop with Pitch Wars Mentors … Brighton Walsh & Jennifer Blackwood!
Jul24

July Workshop with Pitch Wars Mentors … Brighton Walsh & Jennifer Blackwood!

Welcome to the July Query & 1st Page Workshop with some of our PitchWars mentors. We selected many wonderful writers from a drawing held in June to participate in the workshop. Each mentor has graciously critiqued either a query or first page for two writers. The writers are anonymous and the titles/genres are hidden. Follow along all month to view the critiques. We welcome comments and further suggestions, but please keep them kind and respectful. Here are the next two mentors and their critiques …   Brighton Walsh Website | Twitter | Facebook | Goodreads | Pinterest Brighton spent nearly a decade as a professional photographer before deciding to take her storytelling in a different direction and reconnect with her first love: writing. When she’s not pounding away at the keyboard, she’s probably either reading or shopping—maybe even both at once. She lives in the Midwest with her husband and two children, and, yes, she considers forty degrees to be hoodie weather. Her home is the setting for frequent dance parties, Lego battles, and more laughter than she thought possible. She is represented by Mandy Hubbard of D4EO Agency. Brighton’s debut novel, Caged in Winter, will be published November 4, 2014 from Berkley/Penguin. You can pre-order it now!   Brighton’s critiques …   Critique #53 – First Page: Lily Ellis wished her parents had waited until after breakfast for their latest fight. Or chosen to have it anywhere other than the kitchen. She was hungry. More description here. (i.e. her stomach rumbled loud enough to shake the walls.) But knowing better than to walk in on them mid row, she waited at the top of the stairs and stared at the wonky family photo slipped off its nail. Not surprising after all the recent door slamming. Hanging lopsided, their smiling faces looked ready to fall out of the frame and on to the floor. She straightened it up; saving them all and wishing it were as simple as that in real life. Great detail painted in this paragraph! Milo nudged her hand with his nose. Thank God she had him. Her hero dog, her best friend, rescued four years ago when she was eight, from a shelter when no one else wanted him. Funny, it felt like he’d been rescuing her ever since. Nice—in just a sentence, we see how much he means to her. His ears pricked up at the sound of his name. This is a little confusing here. Maybe say something about the sound of his name coming from her parents drifted up from downstairs. “I heard that too.“ What did Milo have to do with...

Read More