THAT DOGGONE VOICE WORKSHOP … wrap up
Jul11

THAT DOGGONE VOICE WORKSHOP … wrap up

link I’ve had a lot of fun reading and critiquing the entries for THAT DOGGONE VOICE WORKSHOP. The talent and professionalism amazes me. Unfortunately, due to series of unforeseen events, agent Lauren Hammond with ADA Management won’t be able to make it to all your entries to comment on them. But I have to say, the wonderful voice team did such an awesome job of critiquing your work that I’m in complete awe of their brilliance.  Should you want to post a revision of your first page in the comments of your entry’s post, please feel free to do so. I will give you final feedback on it.  Here’s a few words from the fantabulous Voice Team …   Leigh Ann Kopans Website Twitter: @LeighAnnKopans Thanks so much for having me and letting me read all the amazing entries in That Doggone Voice Workshop! I mean, we seriously lucked out, didn’t we? From a random entry picker, it’s like a miracle that every single writer was so talented. Wow.  So, well done, all of you. You know, Brenda, you ran this workshop because Voice is just SO difficult to grab a hold of and wrestle into a book. And as hard as it is, it’s that much more difficult in just the first 250 words of a novel. Writers have to ground the reader in the story’s world, tell us something about the main character, give us a story hook, entice us to turn the page, AND establish voice.  Confession time: I realized while I was writing this recap that I actually have no solid advice on a surefire way to establish voice in your writing, because all I’ve ever done is listen to my characters and write down what they said. But then I realized that that’s really not such bad advice. Look, you’ve done the hard work of dreaming up this story and characters to go with it. Trust those characters that they know how to tell their own story.  A lot of the snags I hit when reading the entries had to do with the writer of the story jumping in and cutting off the Main Character. “Wait,” the writer seemed to be saying, “I don’t think you know what you’re doing here, Main Character. Shut up for a second and let me step in and explain to the reader the precise pink tone of that Heffalump’s fur, or the exact tang of the fancy vodka you’re drinking. Or even what you really meant to say when you said that one thing.” Well, here’s the thing, writers –  With all due respect, no reader picks up...

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